West Nile Virus

West Nile virus is an arbovirus (short for arthropod-borne virus) that causes encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Arboviruses are transmitted by blood-feeding insects such as mosquitoes. Most infections with West Nile virus have been identified in wild birds, horses and humans, but the virus can also infect various other wild and domestic animals.

West Nile virus was first identified in the West Nile district of Uganda in 1937, and has since been found in other parts of Africa, Eastern Europe, West Asia, the Middle East, and the United States. The strain of virus found in the United States most closely resembles that found in the Mediterranean and Middle East. The virus has been reported in nearly all states.

This information has been prepared as a service by the American Veterinary Medical Association.


Download Full FREE Brochure